Essay on “Crimes against Humanity” by Kerstin von Lingen

Kerstin von Lingen, Lecturer at the University of Heidelberg, has recently published a very readable online essay on the term of “Crimes against Humanity” and its historical development in the course of the twentieth century. You will find Kerstin’s essay in Zeithistorische Forschungen/Studies in Contemporary History published by the Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung Potsdam @:

http://www.zeithistorische-forschungen.de/site/40209177/default.aspx

Kerstin is the Coordinator of the Junior Research Group: Transcultural Justice: Legal Flows and the Emergence of International Justice within the East Asian War Crimes Trials, 1946-1954.

IMG_2617 Continue reading

Debate on the “Courts of Mixed Commission for the Abolition of the Slave Trade” and International Human Rights Law

Jenny S. Martinez, Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and former associate legal officer at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague, has published in 2012 her compelling law study The Slave Trade and the Origins of International Human Rights Law, Oxford University Press 2012.

Martinez-Cover-design2-197x300

 

In her very readable book she argues that international human rights law derives its origins from the “Courts of Mixed Commission for the Abolition of the Slave Trade”, which were located around the Atlantic in West Africa, South Africa, South America as well as the Caribbean and were established to judge captured slave ships in the period from 1819 to 1871. Thus Martinez draws a direct line to the development of the International Criminal Justice system of the 20th and 21st centuries. Continue reading