CfP: Graduate Workshop 2019 “European History across Boundaries from the Sixteenth to the Twentieth Century”

Academy Conveners: Sarah Panter (Leibniz Institute of European History, Mainz), Johannes Paulmann (Leibniz Institute of European History, Mainz) and Lyndal Roper (University of Oxford)

Venue: University of Oxford

Date: 13–15 March 2019

Deadline for Applications: 15 October 2018

The Leibniz Institute of European History at Mainz, Germany, and the University of Oxford, Faculty of History, invite international Ph.D. students to a workshop on European history across boundaries from the 16th to the 20th century, including Europe’s relations with the world. We encourage researchers working in this field to present their Ph.D. projects and to discuss the transcultural and transnational scope of their findings in a stimulating environment. Topics that aim to cross and reflect boundaries and borders are of particular interest. Projects can employ a variety of methodical approaches such as comparative studies, the study of transfer processes and entanglements, or the histoire croisée.

At the workshop, we will discuss pre-circulated papers based on archival research (max. 8,000 words, written in English, to be submitted by 15 February 2019). Accommodation for the duration of the workshop and a contribution to travel expenses within Europe will be provided.Proposals should include an abstract of the overall project and its archival sources (500 words) plus a brief biographical note (including institutional affiliation, thesis supervisors, and contact details). They should be sent in one pdf-file to Sarah Panter – panter@ieg-mainz.de – by no later than 15 October 2018. For any questions, please contact the organisers.

CfP: Food Security and the Contemporary World

Call for papers for a special issue of Contemporanea. Rivista di storia dell’800 e del ’900

1127-3070

Food security is currently the focus of an international debate, which, in tackling the questions of malnutrition and starvation, also looks at global problems such as the North-South relationship, asymmetrical access to resources, and the world food system. Historians have contributed to this debate by generally identifying the years following the Second World War as the period in which contemporary policies took shape. This development may been seen by the United Nations’ decision to take up the question of food security and the creation of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), later accompanied by the World Food Programme (WFP 1961). From this perspective, the policies of the UN Agencies, intergovernmental agreements and negotiations between states have provided scholars with a key to interpreting the events of later decades within the context of the Cold War. Continue reading