Conference: ‘Jewish Questions’ in International Politics. Diplomacy, Rights, and Intervention

Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture, Leipzig
University
12/06/2014-13/06/2014,

Leipzig, Simon Dubnow Institute, Goldschmidt 28,
04103 Leipzig, Gr. Seminarraum

In recent years a growing number of works have studied the role Jews
played in shaping the international system in the 19th and 20th
centuries to defend the rights of Jews in Europe and beyond. Dealing
with ‘Jewish questions’ such as citizenship and emancipation as well as
experiences of persecution, this field of research at the same time
reflects structures and problems of modern international politics more
generally.

The Dubnow Institute 2014 annual conference presents fresh studies on
this subject matter and seeks to discuss the historiographical and
conceptual questions that arise from the ‘transnational turn’ in modern
Jewish history. The papers in the conference will explore topics
relating to Jews and European empire, international organization,
transnational philanthropy, humanitarian intervention, minority rights,
human rights and collective claims.

Conference Programme

Continue reading

Workshop “Human Rights in Global History”, University of Warwick

Charles Walton, Global History & Culture Center of the University of Warwick, is organizing an international  Workshop on “Human Rights in Global History” on 29 January 2014.

Human Rights

The programme includes:

  • Olivier Grenouilleau (University of Paris IV-La Sorbonne):

“Abolition of Slavery and International Rights for Humanitarian Reasons”

  • Fabian Klose (Leibniz Institute of European History, Mainz):

“Enforcing Humanity – The Emergence of Humanitarian Intervention”

  • Saul Dubow (University of London, Queen Mary):

“The Problem of Rights for Apartheid and Anti-Apartheid South Africa”

  • Jenny Raflik-Grenouilleau (University of Cergy-Pontoise):

“Human Rights or Peoples’ Rights: Some Reflections”

  • Charles Walton (University of Warwick):

“Rights, Reciprocity and the Politics of Obligation: 18th-20th Centuries”

 

For more detailed information see:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/ghcc/events/?calendarItem=094d43d5419c9cbd01419ca483da02c5

 

024 7652 3350 Email: Amy.Evans@warwick.ac.uk

France in Africa – Imperialist Humanitarian?

Martin Thomas

Director, Centre for the Study of War, State and Society, University of Exeter

Cross-posted from http://imperialglobalexeter.com/

13/01/14

As the UN warns of an impending humanitarian disaster in the Central African Republic (CAR), what should we make of France’s recent back-to-back interventions in sub-Saharan Africa? Is there an echo in this of the clientalist politics pursued by France in Africa in the years after formal decolonization?

François Hollande, a Socialist president flagging in domestic opinion polls as France languishes in recession, has been credited with exceptional decisiveness in international affairs. The French President’s willingness to restore France’s role as a global policeman became apparent soon after he took office. He lent unflinching support to the overthrow of Colonel Gaddafi, for which France, like Britain, contributed combat aircraft (although maintaining their strike capability was substantially down to the Americans). He made no secret of his disappointment at the successive refusals of London and Washington to endorse missile strikes against President Assad’s Syrian regime in the aftermath of its proven chemical weapons attacks. And French nuclear negotiators among the team that concluded November’s transitional deal with Iran were, it transpires, especially hawkish over monitoring and inspection regimes. Continue reading

Essay on “Humanitarian Intervention and International Jurisdiction in the 19th Century”

Concerning my post on the research and discussion on the topic of the “Courts of Mixed Commission for the Abolition of the Slave Trade and International Human Rights Law” (see my post, 11/10/2013) I would like to point to my article Humanitäre Intervention und internationale Gerichtsbarkeit – Verflechtung militärischer und juristischer Implementierungsmaßnahmen zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts (“Humanitarian Intervention and International Jurisdiction. The Entanglement of Military and Juridical Enforcement in the 19th Century”), which was recently published in the journal: Militärgeschichtliche Zeitschrift, 72 (2013) Heft 1, p. 1-21.

s21966850k

In this essay I argue that the origins of the phenomena of international jurisdiction and humanitarian intervention can already be found in the beginning of the nineteenth century. The article combines both topics and shows that these two concepts are directly related to one another. Beginning with the international ban of the slave trade at the Congress of Vienna in 1815 the analysis focuses on the corresponding implementation machinery created under the significant leadership of Great Britain. This machinery consisted of a hitherto unique combination of military and juridical measures – the naval anti-slave trade patrols and the “Courts of Mixed Commission” – which were both directly dependent on each other. The main argument of the article is that the geneses of the concept of international jurisdiction and humanitarian intervention are significantly entangled with each other and both of their origins lie in the fight against the transatlantic slave trade in the beginning of the nineteenth century.

If you are interested in reading my essay you will find it @:

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/mgzs.2013.72.issue-1/issue-files/mgzs.2013.72.issue-1.xml

Review of the edited volume “The History and Practice of Humanitarian Intervention and Aid in Africa”

Bronwen Everill, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the King`s College London, and Josiah Kaplan, Research Associate at the Department of International Development of the University of Oxford, have recently published the interdisciplinary volume The History and Practice of Humanitarian Intervention and Aid in Africa, Basingstoke/New York, Palgrave Macmillan 2013. Both editors compiled a variety of interesting essays by scholars of international relations as well as historians, which deal with cases of humanitarianism in sub-Saharan Africa. Seeking to investigate the continuities and evolutions since the colonial era, Everill and Kaplan deliberately chose a rather broad conceptual approach, one that “sees humanitarian military interventions as part of a series of related activities – or ‘interventions’ – in African societies, which includes military action, economic aid, political support and state-building and assistance” (p. 3).

Browne Kaplan

However, by subsuming assistance for refugees, medical campaigns to combat leprosy, various forms of charity, famine relief, and discourses on good governance under the term of humanitarian intervention, in my opinion the editors run the risk of blurring the term and losing its conceptual precision. Both editors acknowledge the analytic importance of a long-term historical perspective and emphasize the need to link nineteenth-century colonial experiences with today’s humanitarian engagement in Africa. Yet the volume actually contains only one genuine essay dealing with the nineteenth century; nearly all of the other contributions concentrate on case studies from the second half of the twentieth century. The international relations approach seems to dominate the volume at the expense of the intended deeper historical perspective. Despite this conceptual critique each individual essay of the volume offers new intriguing perspectives of various forms of humanitarianism in sub-Saharan Africa. You will find my complete review of the volume @ http://www.sehepunkte.de/2013/11/23978.html.

Research Topics, Part 1: Humanitarianism and Intervention

One aim of our blog is to identify, present, discuss and exchange ideas about emerging research topics in the prospering field of the history of humanitarianism and human rights. Today I would like to point to one of these new research topics, namely “Humanitarianism and Intervention”.

In my current research project ‘In the cause of humanity’ here at the IEG Mainz (http://www.ieg-mainz.de/likecms/media/public/personen/Projekt_Klose.pdf) I work about various humanitarian interventions in the 19th century and their impact to an early history of the development of international humanitarian norms. In my eyes it is important to historicize the phenomena of enforcing humanitarian norms by military means and to bridge the experiences of various centuries of “enforcing humanity”. For instance the conference “The Emergence of Humanitarian Intervention. Concepts and Practices in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.”, which I have organized in October 2012 at the Historischen Kolleg in Munich, sought to investigate the historical emergence of humanitarian intervention in the 19th and 20th centuries. Acknowledging the multi-dimensional and interdisciplinary character of the topic, the conference brought together a group of international experts from different disciplines such as international law, sociology, political science, and history, thus emphasizing the enrichment of research from different perspectives and various approaches.

Poster

The four leading themes and questions of the conference were:

  1. Which concepts, actors, and practices of humanitarian intervention can be identified in the 19th and 20th centuries?
  2. Where are the philosophical and legal origins of enforcing humanitarian norms by military means?
  3. Which role does the mobilization of public opinion play in the decision for and against humanitarian intervention?
  4. What is the relationship between the humanitarian justification to protect and the interest of power politics to interfere in the sovereign rights of states? What chances and risks are implied in the concept of humanitarian intervention?

If you are interested in reading the complete conference report by Adrian Franco, you will find it at:

http://www.academia.edu/2972237/The_Emergence_of_Humanitarian_Intervention._Concepts_and_Practices_from_the_19th_to_the_20th_Centuries