Global Humanitarianism Research Academy (GHRA)

We, Fabian Klose (IEG Mainz), Johannes Paulmann (IEG Mainz), and Andrew Thompson (University of Exeter), are happy to announce that, in cooperation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (Geneva), we are starting the Global Humanitarianism Research Academy (GHRA) in July 2015.

Exeter      IEG      ICRC

This international Research Academy will offer research training to a group of advanced international PhD candidates and early postdoctoral scholars selected by the steering committee. It will combine academic sessions at the Leibniz Institute of European History in Mainz and the Imperial and Global History Centre at the University of Exeter with archival sessions at the Archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva. The Research Academy is open to early career researchers who are working in the related fields of humanitarianism, humanitarian law, peace and conflict studies as well as human rights covering the period from the 18th to the 20th centuries. It supports scholarship on the ideas and practices of humanitarianism in the context of international, imperial and global history thus advancing our understanding of global governance in humanitarian crises of the present.

The official Call for Applications will be soon published here on http://hhr.hypotheses.org/ and on http://imperialglobalexeter.com/, so if you are interested in applying keep following our blogs!

Fabian Klose                         Johannes Paulmann                        Andrew Thompson

PhD Grant for research on “The History of the Ottoman Red Crescent”

At the Leibniz Institute of European History (IEG) in Mainz there is currently a research project on the history of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement in its global dimension, especially in the Arab world. Within this research field the Leibniz Institute is offering a PhD grant for a research project on the history of the Ottoman Red Crescent.

The IEG promotes research on the historical foundations of Europe from the early modern period to the present day. The central theme of the IEG’s research programme is negotiating difference – enabling, establishing and confronting religious, political and social differences in early modern and modern Europe. In doing so, it also considers the question of Europe’s frontiers and its relations with the regions beyond.

The PhD project should relate to the institute’s research on the subject of “humanitarian ideas and practices”. The history of humanitarianism has recently been discovered as an important field of History and is still lacking studies on non-Western, non-Christian forms, ideas and practices of humanitarian aid. The project on the first Islamic branch of the Red Cross movement will respond to this lacuna in research and present an innovative work based on unexplored archival sources.

Continue reading